homepage
Skip to page body Home About Round Rock What's New City Services Library Parks & Recreation Departments
spacer
Round Rock, Texas - Purpose. Passion. Prosperity.
spacer
  Click here to start search.
spacer
Administration
City Attorney
Finance
Fire
General Services
Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Human Resources
Inspection Services
Library
Municipal Court
Parks & Recreation
Planning and Development Services
Police
Purchasing
Transportation
Utilities & Environmental Services
Utility Billing
Chisholm Trail Reconstruction and Chisholm Parkway Extension
spacer
 Africanized Honey Bees
Print
Facts about Africanized Honey Bees

BeesIn the years past, we have had reports throughout the United States of Africanized honey bees, but in most all cases, they are simply a variety of European honey bees.  Below we will share with you some of the facts about bees, but first we need you to understand one very important fact: You can not determine if a bee is Africanized by simply looking at the bee with the naked eye. 

In order to determine if a bee is Africanized or not, we must send it to Texas A & M for examination. So if someone tells you that the bees are Africanized, take caution and treat them with respect, but realize that the chances are very low that is possible.

Africanized honey bees were imported to Brazil in 1956 to enhance honey production in the tropics. Some of the bees escaped into the wild and have gradually moved towards North America.

Africanized honey bees are the temperamental cousin of the more common European honey bee found in Texas. They often are called "killer bees," but in reality their stings are less potent and painful than the common bee sting. Contrary to portrayal in the movies, these bees do not swoop down in mass causing death and destruction. They do defend their nesting sites very aggressively, sometimes stinging their victims hundreds of times.

It is impossible for the average person to tell the difference between an Africanized honey bee and the common European honey bee. Only an expert with sophisticated lab equipment is able to distinguish between the two. Those at highest risk are individuals who are allergic to bee stings and pets that are penned or tied up near honey bee hives.

Do's and Don'ts

DO check your property regularly for bee colonies. Honey bees nest in a wide variety of places, especially Africanized honey bees. Check animal burrows, water meter boxes, overturned flower pots, trees and shrubs.

DO keep pets and children indoors when using weed eaters, hedge clippers, tractor power mowers, chain saws, etc. Bee attacks frequently occur when a person is mowing the lawn or pruning shrubs and inadvertently strikes a bee's nest -- any bee or wasp's normal reaction.

DO avoid excessive motion when near a colony. Bees are much more likely to respond to an object in motion than a stationary one.

DON'T pen, tie or tether animals near bee hives or nests.

DON'T destroy bee colonies or hives, especially with pesticides. Honey bees are a vital link to U.S. agriculture. Each year, pollination by honey bees add at least $10 billion to the value of more than 90 crops. They also produce about $150 million worth of honey each year.

DON'T remove bees yourself. If you want bees removed, look in the yellow pages under "bee removal" or "beekeepers."

What to do if you are attacked:

  • Run as quickly as you can away from the bees.
  • Do not flail or swing your arms at them, as this may further annoy them.
  • Because bees target the head and eyes, cover your head as much as you can without slowing your escape.
  • Get to the shelter or closest house or car as quickly as possible. Don't worry if a few bees become trapped in your home. If several bees follow you into your car, drive about a quarter of a mile and let the bees out of the car.

When to call the Fire Department
Call the fire department only when emergency medical services are needed. If someone has been stung by many bees at once or has an allergic reaction to a bee sting, call 9-1-1.

Call the fire department if someone has become trapped in a building or car with lots of bees. Fire trucks are equipped with a foam that can be sprayed on the bees to drown them. Do not call the fire department to remove bee colonies or hives. If you want bees removed, look in the yellow pages under "bee removal" or "beekeepers." Contact your local Animal Control if you are not sure what to do.

How to treat bee stings
Treating stings from Africanized bees is much the same as treating a common bee sting. If a person is stung:

  • Keep the affected area below the heart.
  • If the sting was by a bee and the stinger is still in the skin, remove it by gently scraping against it with your fingernail, a credit card or a knife. Be careful not to squeeze the stinger. The venom sac still will be attached and you will inject additional venom into the area. Be sure to remove the venom sac.
  • Apply cold compresses to relieve pain and swelling but do not apply ice directly.
  • If it becomes difficult to breathe, call 9-1-1. Itching should quit within a few hours. If it persists beyond two days, or if signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction occur after an insect bite you should be seen by a doctor.

The signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction include:  

  • Burning pain and itching at the bite site
  • Itching on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet
  • Itching on the neck and the groin
  • General body swelling
  • A nettle like rash over the entire body
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Faintness, weakness
  • Nausea
  • Shock
  • Unconsciousness 

spacer
spacer
City of Round Rock | 221 East Main Street, Round Rock, Texas 78664 | Phone: (512) 218-5400
©2014 City of Round Rock. All Rights Reserved. | Customer Survey | Site Map | About this website