Allan Houser Sculpture Exhibit

Allan Houser Sculpture Exhibit:  April 27, 2018 – May 2019

Allan Houser Art Exhibit and Map at Centennial Plaza

This is a first major exhibition in Texas of Houser’s work.  Allan Houser was the most renowned Native American painters and Modernist sculptors of the 20th century. Round Rock is featuring 18 of his original sculpture pieces at Centennial Plaza.

If you are interested in purchasing an Allan Houser original art sculpture, please contact the Arts and Culture Director at 512-671-2705 or swilkinson@roundrocktexas.gov

Docent tours are available by appointment of Houser’s work at Centennial Plaza. Contact Chappell Oats or Tom Shehan at HouserRoundRock@gmail.com

More about Allan Houser:

Allan Capron Houser or Haozous (June 30, 1914 – August 22, 1994) was a Chiricahua Apache sculptor, painter and book illustrator born in Oklahoma. He was one of the most renowned Native American painters and Modernist sculptors of the 20th century.

Houser’s work can be found at the Smithsonian Museum of American Art, the National Museum of the American Indian, the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C., and in numerous major museum collections throughout North America, Europe and Japan. Additionally, Houser’s Offering of the Sacred Pipe is on display at United States Mission to the United Nations in New York City.

Allan Houser’s International Fame grew from a modest beginning and a unique heritage. As a child he brought pencil and paper home from school to make drawings of what he saw on the family farm. He had no art teachers, there were no galleries or museums nearby- he was born with an inner muse to create art. He took inspiration from his father, Sam Haozous , who was among the population of Chircahua Apaches imprisoned for 27 years following Geronimo’s surrender in 1886.  

The first child born after their release from captivity was Allan Capron Haozous. He would be come known to the world as Allan Houser.

He first came to Santa Fe in 1934 as a student in the Painting Studio at the Santa Fe Indian School. The class, led by Dorothy Dunn, taught only one specific style of painting. Encouraged to portray traditional and ceremonial lives of the Apache, Allan began with stylized interpretations of the Apache Ghans (Mountain Spirits) Dance.  Near the end of his courses at the Santa Fe Indian School he was selected from his fellow students to paint a mural at the Department of Interior Building in Washington DC. In 1938 he painted “Breaking Camp” on the back wall of the newly christened INDIAN CRAFT SHOP on the building’s ground floor. His first public commission, it remains there today, as do four other murals painted in 1939 on the building’s top floor “penthouse”.

He spent 1942-1946 in Los Angeles employed in the construction industry. He continued to paint, but in 1947 he was approached by administrators at the Interior Department with the proposition of doing a large sculptural memorial for those Native soldiers who served and died in World War II. With no training as a sculptor, and starting with the most rudimentary of tools he created his first major sculpture titled “Comrade in Mourning”. Completed and installed at the Haskell School in Lawrence, Kansas, it would be the first of nearly 1000 sculptures he would create during his lifetime.  He began his 24-year teaching career in 1952 at the Inter-mountain School in Brigham City, Utah. He returned to Santa Fe in 1962 as the founding instructor at the Institute of American Indian Arts.

While he continued to paint, his teaching years at I.A.I.A. expanded his work with multiple genres and mediums in sculpture. There is no singular “Houser style”, but rather his ongoing explorations inspired and influenced generations of younger artists. His retirement from teaching in 1975 opened the gates for his prolific creation of sculptural works, paintings, and hundreds of large charcoal and pastel drawings. All are rooted in the tens of thousands of sketches dating from the mid- 1950’s and cataloged in the Allan Houser archives.  

Allan Houser also became and still remains among the most widely collected of all American artists. His works are included in museum collections throughout the United States, in Europe, and Asia. He has private collectors in every corner of the world, and his prices continue to lead in both the primary and secondary markets.

His retrospective opened the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in 2004, and since his passing in 1994 he has been honored with 23 major exhibitions including the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City , The Hood Museum at Dartmouth College, Grounds for Sculpture in New Jersey, Naples Museum of Art in Florida, The Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh, The Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, The Oklahoma History Center, ad The Heard Museum in Phoenix.  “Water”, an exhibition of 46 watercolor paintings done in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s has toured under the auspices of the Allan Houser Foundation since 1999 and has been installed in 17 different museum spaces including the Instituto de Americas in Granada, Spain. Iconic works such as “Sacred Rain Arrow”, “Watercarrier”, “Dineh”, “Morning Prayer” and “Next Generation II ” grace museums and public spaces coast to coast.

While the vast majority of Allan Houser’s artworks have been acquired by museums and individual collectors, his works are still are available through a sales inventory of over 350 limited edition bronze and stone sculptures, drawings and paintings.  

If you are interested in purchasing an Allan Houser original art sculpture, please contact the Arts and Culture Director at 512-671-2705 or swilkinson@roundrocktexas.gov

Docent tours are available by appointment of Houser’s work at Centennial Plaza.
Contact Chappell Oats or Tom Shehan at HouserRoundRock@gmail.com