Year: 2017

City leaders attend summit to talk growth, economic development opportunity in Round Rock

  • December 15, 2017

  • By Austin Ellington

  • Posted In: The Quarry

Game-changer! Touchdown! Big win!

Sure, these phrases are synonymous with football, but here in Round Rock, they’re also heard on a pretty regular basis when folks get to talking about our economic development strategy. And at Austin Business Journal’s recent Williamson County Growth Summit, that’s just the topic that had attendees buzzing.

Mayor Craig Morgan, along with Round Rock’s City Manager Laurie Hadley and Councilmembers Writ Baese, Frank Leffingwell and Rene Flores, joined other leaders from across the region in attending a sold-out event focused on the incredible economic growth opportunities being seen across Round Rock and Williamson County as a whole.

Two of the seven panelists were connected to dynamic, new projects recently unveiled as huge economic development successes for the Round Rock community:

Kalahari Resorts & Convention Center
Bill Otto, Executive Vice President at Kalahari Resorts & Conventions

 

Kalahari Resorts has chosen Round Rock as the location of its fourth family resort and convention center. Its proximity to Old Settlers Park and Dell Diamond – two well-established venues that together draw more than a million visitors annually – bodes well for a successful, tourism-oriented development. This is essentially a new industry for Round Rock that will provide substantial property tax revenues and diversify available employment opportunities.

A family-owned business, Kalahari Resorts delivers a “world-away” waterpark resort and conference experience beyond expectations. The authentically African-themed Kalahari Resorts feature well-appointed guest rooms, full-service amenities, fully equipped fitness centers, on-site restaurants, unique retail shops and state-of-the-art conference centers.

The District
Paul Marshall Cate, CEO and President of Mark IV Capital

 

Mark IV oversaw development of Round Rock’s first Class-A office building, The Summit at La Frontera, in 2015, and now has plans to further expand its footprint in Round Rock with a $200 million, 1 million-square-foot mixed-use development. The District is planned for 65 acres east of the Round Rock Crossing shopping center at Texas 45 and North Greenlawn Boulevard.

With projects like these queued up for Round Rock, that not only diversify our tax base (and keep residential property tax rate among the lowest in the state) but also positively impact the quality of life for residents, we’re feeling pretty darn good about the future.

Interested in learning more about the strategy behind some of these projects? Check out the Chamber of Commerce website – the City partners with this organization to find, recruit and help make economic development touchdowns a reality for Round Rock: https://roundrockchamber.org/economic-development/

Round Rock Police, community volunteers help those in need decorate homes for the holidays

  • December 15, 2017

  • By Austin Ellington

  • Posted In: The Quarry

The holiday season is all about giving, and here in Round Rock, we take that sentiment to heart!

This week, community volunteers joined forces with the Round Rock Police Department, Meals on Wheels, and Home Depot to help decorate the homes of local residents. All together, more than 1,800 lights were installed.

During the event, one resident noted that she had never had Christmas lights before. Her son had promised to hang some for her, but unfortunately never had the opportunity before he passed away in 2010. The resident was incredibly grateful to have so many people come to her home and decorate it for the very first time.

“It was amazing to see Round Rock come together to brighten the holidays for these folks. This is what community is all about,” said Joe Brehm, Community Development Administrator for the City of Round Rock.

Considered such a success in its first year, plans are already being made to expand and improve it for next year. Thank you to Home Depot, Meals on Wheels and the Round Rock Police Department for making it possible for us to help bring a little ho-ho-hometown holiday spirit to the lives of a few local residents!

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Watering in Winter

  • December 4, 2017

  • By Jessica Woods

  • Posted In: Water Spot

Winter is here and that means it’s the start of the wastewater averaging (WWA) season.  What is wastewater averaging, you ask?  Well, let me tell you…

In the winter months the City assumes that our water usage is lower than any other time of year simply because it’s cold out (its winter and ideally cold!) and we’re not watering our yards.  As an aside, during winter the lawn and landscape isn’t growing, it’s going dormant.  No need to water it at all, just an occasional watering once a month is plenty.  Because these month’s water consumption is low, the City uses these 3 billing cycles (Nov-Dec, Dec-Jan, Jan-Feb) to determine how much you’re going to be charged for wastewater (a.k.a. sewer) for the rest of the year.  The City has no meter on the wastewater line coming out of your house, so we can’t see exactly how much water is being put down the drains; we make an educated assumption that all water being used at your house is going down the drain.  Since no water is being used outdoors (Right??  Turn off those sprinkler systems!), then the theory is that all water is being used indoors, for necessary purposes—baths, showers, toilets, sinks, dish and clothes washers, etc.

The average of these months water use is what you are charged for wastewater for the remainder of the year.  So, for example, if you use 5400 gallons on your Dec bill, 4900 on January bill, and 4500 on February bill then your WWA would be 5400 + 4900 + 4500 / 3 = 4933, which would be rounded to 4900 gallons.  So, for the rest of the year, the most you’ll be charged for wastewater is 4900 gallons!  That’s good!  No matter if your water use goes higher in the summer; the waste water use is capped at 4900 gallons.

This is a number that is recalculated annually, so if you “mess up” and refill your pool or keep watering that yard the whole winter, you can fix it the next year by keeping the water use down.  So again, turn off those sprinklers!  Fix leaks!

Another way to keep water use low in winter is to check for leaks, especially in your toilets.  Watch our video to learn how to check your toilet to see if it’s efficient or if it’s leaking.  Dye tablets to check toilets for leaks are available free of charge at our utility billing office (in City Hall), or food coloring works well too.

I say in the video that toilets using 1.6 gallons per flush (gpf) or less are considered efficient.  I want to add to that by saying that as of January 1, 2014, it became state law that all toilets sold in Texas must use 1.28 gallons per flush OR LESS.  So that means even if you have a 1.6 gpf toilet, you can make it even more efficient, and save more water each time you flush (and reduce those waste water charges further) by upgrading to a new 1.28 gpf toilet!  Upgrading from an older model toilet to a new one can save up to 4,000 gallons yearly!  Wow!  How many toilets do you have in your house that can be upgraded?

The City’s Water Conservation Program’s has a rebate program for this upgrade (could be a useful Christmas gift??).  Find the details about the toilet rebate at www.cityofroundrocktexas.gov/conservation.

5 Signs You’re Watering Too Much

A high water bill may be your first clue that something is terribly amiss. But there are a few other signs that signal you may be overwatering your landscape.

Sometimes the biggest water waste happens in perfectly manicured lawns, watering on the correct time and day, with no signs of broken sprinklers or anything wrong.  In such a case, a high water bill may be the customer’s first clue that something’s terrible amiss in the water department. But here are a few signs to watch for — usually in summer, but any time of year if you’re overwatering:

  1.  Cockroaches:If you see cockroaches wandering around shrubs, pots, grasses and the yard in general, you’ve got a perfect habitat for cockroaches — and that means your yard is as wet as the inside of a sewer pipe. Sound gross?

Cockroaches thrive on decomposing plant material. So remember, all that extra water is probably building up as thatch and rotting your grass from below. Other insects that benefit from too much water: pillbugs, millipedes and especially fire ants.

2. Dollarweed:  Dollarweed is one of those plants so tenacious it’s created an industry of big-box weed killers for homeowners trying to get rid of it. Hint: dollarweed requires even more water to look good than grass — so if your grass is drowning in dollarweed, put down the weedkiller and pick up the sprinkler instruction.

3.  Fungus:

Has it been raining? Then look for mushrooms. But if there are still mushrooms in dry, warm winter weather, your lawn is probably staying wet and poorly drained; not a good idea, since in addition to mushrooms, some of the most common fungal turf diseases include take-all patch and brown patch.

4.  Wet walls, fences, and cans:  It’s not just the amount of water you use, it’s where you put it. By some estimates, about one-fifth of summer irrigation water is spent watering side yards, AC condensers, toolsheds and garbage cans — and that’s way too much.  Heads in the side yard can be capped or turned off to reduce watering items that do not need the extra water.

5.  Runoff:  Pools of water are a sure sign the run times are too long on your sprinkler system. If the yard is too steep to hold much water, cycle and soak may be a better method. Remember, your bedding plants typically need less water than grass.

So remember, use common sense when it comes to your outdoor use.  If things feel or look too wet, reduce the time by 2 minutes to see how it helps the problems.  Wait at least a week before making more changes.

Round Rock first responders honored by “Good Morning America,” country superstar Dierks Bentley

Hometown heroes. They are the men and women who risk their lives day-in and day-out to keep our local communities safe. And when disaster strikes hundreds of miles away? They again stand tall in the face of adversity, proud to serve their neighbors in need.

As Hurricane Harvey pummeled the Texas coast, Round Rock first responders quickly came together to answer calls for assistance. They said goodbye to their own families and worked to help save the lives of others, reconnect loved ones and began the long road of working to rebuild communities devastated by the storm. They, like they do all so often, put the lives of others before their own, without hesitation.

Often lost in the shuffle of the next big story, the effort of these men and women is many times overlooked. But not today.

This morning, country superstar Dierks Bentley and the folks from “Good Morning America” invited local first responders, including those from Round Rock who were part of the Hurricane Harvey response team, to a surprise block party where they received a very special “thank you.”

So how did our local first responders help during Harvey rescue and relief? Here’s a quick rundown:

Round Rock Police Department

  • We had three police officers respond personally in the first day or two using their own or friend’s boats
  • Our police department and Police Officers Association collected $4,600 in cash and filled up a trailer full of baby wipes, beef jerky, bug spray, hand sanitizer, Gatorade, and numerous other non-perishables to provide to first responders in Sugar Land as well as their families during this difficult time
  • At the request of the State Operations Center, we sent five officers to assist the Houston Police Department for seven days, pulling 14-16 hour shifts, to cover neighborhood checkpoints and conduct criminal apprehension patrols
  • We also sent five officers to Vidor, to assist with crime suppression and apprehension. These officers worked 14 days straight, pulling 14-16 hour shifts

Round Rock Fire Department

  • An Engine Company of five firefighters deployed to Bacliff to fight fires and perform low water rescues
  • A boat team with five firefighters deployed to Montgomery County, and performed many water rescues
  • A second boat team with five firefighters deployed to the Port Arthur area, and performed many water rescues
  • A tanker crew with two firefighters responded to Beaumont to assist with firefighting capabilities
  • Two elite personnel who serve on Texas Task Force One deployed to Rockport and later to Rosenberg, conducting search and rescue operations
  • Four command staff served 12-hour shifts at the State Operations Center in Austin to fill emergency management positions
  • Two logistics staff assisted at a state warehouse in San Antonio to assist statewide operations
  • One firefighter was part of the Texas Task Force One crew that was among the first search and rescue teams to deploy to Puerto Rico

To say we are extremely proud of our public safety team would be an absolute understatement.

To each and every member of those teams: You are truly deserving of the word hero. Thank you for keeping our hometown safe and thank you for making Texas, the United States, and our world a better place to call home.

September is National Preparedness Month

  • September 19, 2017

  • By Sara Bustilloz

  • Posted In: The Quarry


September is National Preparedness Month, which is designed to increase the overall number of individuals, families and communities that engage in preparedness actions at home, work, business, school and place of worship. The recent examples of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are good reminders of the importance of being prepared for emergencies.

While many communities in Texas and Florida are still dealing with the impact of these storms, we should all focus on ensuring we are prepared for the next emergency that could impact our community, whether large or small.

Here are some places you can go to help you begin your journey to becoming better prepared:

City Homeland Security and Emergency Management Division – Committed to serving the City of Round Rock before, during and after a major emergency or disaster. Find information on local threats and hazards, and ways you can become better prepared.

Warn Central Texas – A regional resource, sign up for emergency alerts and obtain preparedness information from the localities in the region.

Preparing Wilco – Williamson County Emergency Services Facebook page, and it contains a great deal of information and resources to help you prepare. You can also find out about WILCO Ready, its new preparedness app.

National Preparedness Month – Information on National Preparedness Month and the weekly themes being highlighted. There, you can access a multitude of additional information and resources that can help you on your journey.

Ready.gov – A repository of emergency preparedness information from the Federal government, you can find a variety of great information and resources on becoming prepared.

While September is designated National Preparedness Month, it is important to remember that preparedness is a year-round task. Emergencies can happen at any time, so we should all be prepared for whatever comes our way.

Hurricane Harvey recovery: How can Round Rock help?

Let’s take a moment to think about the Houston area and all those along the coast who have been crippled by Hurricane Harvey. Our community has been spared the worst. We are a city that works together with great success day in and day out, so today, let’s take a moment to send positive thoughts to the fellow Texans to our south. This storm has devastated communities and some families have a long, long road to recovery.

Looking for information about how you can help? Here’s a list of local and national organizations who are working tirelessly to help those in need:

Texas Fire Chiefs Association

The Texas Fire Chiefs Association is dedicated to assisting the citizens of Texas and victims of Hurricane Harvey. Over the next several months their focus will be specifically geared towards recovery for the first responders who may have lost their homes and fire departments who may need help getting back on their feet.

A website has been set up to collection donations. Please visit www.texasfireservice.org or click here to donate. Additionally the TFCA is collecting gift cards that can be distributed to the  first responders. Those can be mailed to: TFCA, P.O. Box 66700, Austin, Texas  78766

United Way of Williamson County

United Way of Williamson County will collect items and monetary donations to help meet the immediate and long-term needs of individuals and families in nearby communities affected by the storms. It has set up two options for Williamson County residents to partner with us to provide help and hope in the areas closest to home.

  • Financial contributions: Monetary donations can be made online at www.unitedway-wc.org, or by texting the word WilcoCares to 91999, or via check. All checks should be made out to United Way of Williamson County-Hurricane Relief Fund and should be mailed to P.O. Box 708, Round Rock, TX 78680. One hundred percent of donations will be directed to hurricane relief efforts. United Way of Williamson County will not be collecting administrative fees for this fund. Monetary donations are tax deductible. United Way of Williamson County is working closely with the network of United Ways across Texas to identify the areas in most critical need of resources.                
  • #WilcoCares Supply Drive: From Wednesday, Aug. 30 through Sept. 15, United Way of Williamson County is coordinating the collection of cleaning supplies and personal care items at locations in Cedar Park, Georgetown, Round Rock, and Taylor. Accepted items include bottled water, cleaning supplies, contractor grade trash bags, mops and buckets, heavy duty work gloves, hand sanitizer and more. Absolutely no clothing or bedding will be accepted due to a lack of time and resources available to sort and store those items. A detailed list of accepted donations can be found at www.unitedway-wc.org. The collection location in Round Rock is at 1111 N. IH-35, Ste. 220. Hours are Monday-Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Friday: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.   

Austin Disaster Relief Network

ADRN is taking donations and helping groups to set up fundraisers to meet the immediate emergency needs of survivors and help fund the long-term repairs/rebuilds of homes. Taking community volunteer sign ups.

Salvation Army

The organization says it prefers monetary donations to food or other goods, as it can use the money to provide exactly what’s needed. It’s taking donations through the website, as well as by phone at 1-800-SAL-ARMY. It accepts checks, “Hurricane Harvey” should be written on them.

NVOAD

Register as a volunteer with National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster at nvoad.org/how-to-help/volunteering/.

Central Texas Blood Bank

Donate blood  weareblood.org.

American Red Cross

Encouraging people to donate money on its website or to text 90999 to donate $10.

Diaper Bank

Diaper Donations being accepted for babies and adults. More information: texasdiaperbank.org

United Way

Houston’s chapter of community support organization United Way has set up a Harvey recovery fund. Donate online and choose to send the money to specific counties or let the organization decide.

Food banks

The Houston Food Bank is at 1-832-369-9390; its website also offers instructions to people willing to donate food and organize food drives, and takes monetary donations of as little as $1.

Traveling to Houston to Volunteer

Register through the disaster portal of Volunteer Houston or All Hands Volunteers, which are coordinating help.

Animal Assistance

Williamson County Animal Shelter is seeking foster homes and donations.

Austin Pets Alive! is seeking foster homes and donations of top current needs:

  1. Large plastic or metal bins with lids so we can safely store food and goods in dry places.
  2. Leashes + Martingale Collars (any size)
  3. Cat Litter – Clumping preferred, but non-clumping needed, as well.
  4. 6 full-size indoor brooms
  5. Cat Beds (not regular bedding)
  6. Liquid laundry soap

Other important needs include: 

  • Dog Treats* – Chew Toys/Rawhides, Treat Logs, Peanut Butter and Milk Bones for Kongs for all of our stressed and crated pups!
  • Paper or Styrafoam Bowls* – For feeding cats.
  • Kitten and Puppy Formula
  • Flea + Tick Prevention
  • Canned Wet Food and Tuna – Now only needed for cats!
  • Litter Boxes – 12×10″ or smaller
  • Large Metal Dog Bowls
  • Large Trash Bags
  • Updated Cleaning Supplies List – Bleach, paper towels, general purpose cleaner, latex gloves, dish soap, sponges.

*Most urgent need

Base ingredient for success is Strategic Plan

As noted in our first budget blog post, the base ingredient in Round Rock’s recipe for success is the Strategic Plan. The plan is updated and reprioritized annually by the City Council, and serves as the foundation for all City initiatives. Here’s how the proposed 2018 budget feeds the plan’s strategic priorities.

Financially Sound City Providing High Value Services

The objectives to this goal are: Diversify City revenues; Expand the City tax base through economic expansion; Maintain financial reserves consistent with City financial policies and national standards; Hire and retain top quality, diverse City workforce dedicated to serving the Round Rock community; Maintain City facilities, equipment and apparatus; Deliver cost effective City services in a customer friendly, pro-business manner; and develop, update and use long-range organization and strategic master planning.

In the proposed budget, to achieve this goal we are adding four staff to Planning and Development Services to ensure timely processing for development applications and inspections. The quicker businesses can get through the development process, the sooner the increased property value can be added to tax rolls and the sooner sales tax revenue can be generated.

We set aside $750,000 every year for facility maintenance and repairs, which is needed to keep facilities from falling into disrepair and requiring more expensive replacement. We also fill up a funding bucket with $750,000 for technology expenditures.

The budget also includes $2.3 million for increasing health insurance costs; $2 million for pay increases to keep public safety salaries competitive; and $942,000 for salary increases and market adjustments for general government employees.

Finally, we’re working with our partners at the Round Rock Chamber on strategies to reinvigorate aging commercial and retail centers.

City Infrastructure: Today and Tomorrow

Objectives for this goal are: Have responsible potable water use by City customers, City facilities and parks; Invest in City infrastructure to support future community growth and economic development; Expand water reuse system serving Northeast areas and parks (where applicable); Improve mobility throughout the City and the region; Upgrade and expand roads; and upgrade and expand drainage and stormwater system

There are always some big ticket items for this goal in a fast-growth community like ours. Building and maintaining the infrastructure that keeps things running doesn’t come cheap. To that end, there’s $42.9 million for roads and streets; $23.8 million in the Water and Wastewater Capital Improvement Plan (CIP); and $6.3 million for the Drainage CIP.

We’re also adding 10 new staff in this area. There’s four in Transportation for an additional street maintenance crew; two in general services for custodial services at the Police headquarters and a facility tech for the Clay Madsen Recreation Center; and four additional employees to take care of our growing water and wastewater utility systems.

Sports Capital of Texas for Tourism and Residents

Objectives for this goal are: Expand sports facilities to support tourism; Increase number of tournaments, regional and national; Develop/maintain additional sports fields – practice, games, sports tourism; Develop partnership with Round Rock ISD for joint use facilities and programs; Upgrade the quality and maintenance of current City sports facilities; Increase revenues from sports tourism/convention for benefit of residents and the local economy; and expand conventions/conferences.

Our sports tourism program is growing with the opening of the Multipurpose Complex at Old Settlers Park; and non-sports tourism will also get a boost when Kalahari Resorts and Conventions opens, which is expected in 2020. The tourism program is designed to bring in sales tax revenue from non-residents, as Ron Pitchman explains. We’re adding two staff to our Sports Management and Tourism team, one for operations and one for marketing; and beefing up the marketing budgets for sports tourism and the convention business.

On the sports facilities front, there’s $850,000 in this budget for converting the Dell Diamond stadium lighting to LED — that will be paid for out of hotel-motel tax revenues. We’re also earmarking $740,000 to cover operating shortfalls when Forest Creek Golf Club closes for much-needed major repairs this fall. We have already set aside $3.5 million for golf course repairs out of our General Self Finance Construction fund.

Great Community to Live

Objectives for this goal include: Expand and diversify the local business and job opportunities for residents; Expand education campuses and programs; Expand/maintain quality of life amenities for residents; Build a community where people prefer to live; Diversify housing opportunities; and redevelop older commercial areas and corridors.

Public safety is fundamental to this goal. To that end, we’ve got 13 new positions planned for Fire and Police. Nine firefighters are needed to complete staffing at our new stations, and there are also funds to upgrade response capabilities at Station 3 and $750,000 for an additional engine. We’re adding two detectives and a crime specialist to the police staff.

Of course, parks are integral to quality of life, and $12.6 million of bond-funded construction will start on expansions to the Brushy Creek trail system. There’s $730,000 in bond funding for a new Adult Sports Complex at Old Settles Park. There’s also a parks maintenance worker included to help at the soon-to-be-expanded Play for All Park. Parks is also requesting $29,000 for adaptive and inclusive recreation programming for the park.

We’re planning to use $2 million in bond funds for siting and design of the new library. We’re adding half an FTE at the Library in the Adult Services area.

Sustainable Neighborhoods — Old and New

Objectives for this goal include: Maintain reputation as the “safest large city”; Upgrade older housing stock, exterior and interior; Ensure homes and commercial areas complying with City codes; Increase neighborhood connectivity through streets, trails and bike lanes; Increase effectiveness of homeowner associations; Repair, upgrade neighborhood infrastructure: streets, sidewalks, utilities, fences, streetscapes; and upgrade neighborhood parks and open spaces.

Neighborhood street maintenance is the largest total here, with $3 million added to the $13.5 million set aside in the current fiscal year.

We’re also proposing funding parks improvements like the Round Rock West Park greenbelt ($575,000), Frontier Park ($300,000) and the Meadow Lake Park pavilion ($136,000).

Last but certainly not least is an additional Code Enforcement officer. Strong, consistent code enforcement ensures safe and desirable living and working environments, and helps maintain property values.

Authentic Downtown — Exciting Community Destination

Objectives for this goal include: Increase public and commercial use of Brushy Creek; Expand housing opportunities: townhomes, apartments, condos; Develop “Gypsum Site”; Increase number of entertainment businesses and venues consistent with City code; Increase Downtown connectivity; and provide safe, convenient, lighted parking.

Road and streetscape improvements continue in our historic downtown, with $3.7 million for the East Bagdad Avenue extension and $3.3 million for southwest downtown.

To keep all the improvements to the streets and sidewalks looking good, we’re adding a maintenance tech dedicated to downtown, and also contracting out landscape maintenance services. Those two items total $178,000 for the fiscal year, and include equipment for the maintenance tech.

A new playground for Memorial Park is planned, at $195,000.

And we’ll continue with our award-winning Downtown marketing initiatives, which are funded by the Type B sales tax for economic development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drought got you down?

  • August 16, 2017

  • By Jessica Woods

  • Posted In: Water Spot

I recently saw a newsletter article by Brad Wier, with San Antonio Water System’s Conservation program that I thought very applicable to us as well. I’m borrowing heavily from it with my blog today.

For many homeowners it’s the norm to use more water on their landscapes in July, August, and September. Although the reason seems obvious — hot and dry months take a visual toll on grass — that’s not why customers double their water use in the summer.

The reason for the high bill comes down to sprinkler programming: adding a second start time to the existing program so the entire system runs both morning and evening.  It’s a perfectly valid thing to do; but it has the effect of automatically doubling your water consumption, with a similar effect on your bill.

Instead of running the entire system twice, run only the zones that actually need it. Remember, some sprinklers can run 20 gallons per minute, or more!  Before you turn them up, determine which zones actually need more water.

Which are your critical zones? Hint: it’s not all of them. Typically, it’s just the grass in full afternoon sun that’s under the most stress, especially if it’s St. Augustine. This might be a single sprinkler station; an extra 10 minutes here may solve the entire problem by targeting the extra water exactly where it’s needed.

Here’s a few places in the landscape that don’t typically need extra water, even in August:

  • Landscape beds
  • The grass sprinklers in the shade under live oaks
  • The garbage cans and the AC condensers
  • The sides of the house
  • The backyard
  • Drip lines (Remember, drip delivers a week’s worth of water directly to the roots in a single cycle; no need to run these more than once per week.

All of this saved run time really adds up when it comes to the bill. When in doubt, don’t change your program. If you need help decoding the sprinkler controller, call or email the Water Conservation staff for a free consultation (if you are a direct City of Round Rock water customer) at 512-671-2872 or email jwoods@roundrocktexas.gov

And remember, if you want a landscape that doesn’t get so crispy in August, it’s better to use shade and landscaping than grass and water.  Add a layer of mulch to bare areas, around trees, shrubs, and in beds.

Would you like to supersize that? Uh, no


Round Rock is a fast-growth community, and has been for decades. To keep pace, we regularly need to beef up spending for core services such as public safety, parks and transportation. But we’re not building a Dagwood, mindlessly adding extra layers of cold cuts and cheese slices … just because.  Before we add new positions we evaluate whether we are utilizing current resources efficiently.

For an appetizer, we’ll cover the staff additions in fiscal 2018 budget proposal. For the main course, below, we’ll share ways we’ve cut calories by working with what’s already in the cupboard.

For starters, the budget proposal contains 35 new full-time employees (FTEs), broken down below by fund type.

General Fund

Thirteen are for public safety (Police and Fire); three for General Services (building and grounds maintenance); four for Parks and Recreation; five for Planning and Development Services; and four for Transportation. Note: Ten of the new Fire staff and one Parks staff are to operate projects voted for in the 2013 bond election. The General Fund is fed by sales taxes, property taxes and some fees.

Utility Fund

Four for maintenance and inspections; and a quarter FTE to cover additional hours for a part-time customer service representative. Utility Fund revenue comes from water and wastewater customers.

Hotel Occupancy Tax Fund

Two total, a marketing and advertising coordinator, and an operations and events assistant coordinator. HOT tax revenue comes from folks staying in Round Rock hotels and motels.

Now for the meat of this post. Here’s the sampler platter of ways the City has kept a close eye on its fiscal waistline in recent years.

Rethinking service strategies

  • Construction of two Fire stations to replace Station No. 4
    • We took the two companies (three firefighters apiece per shift, 12 total) from the old Station 4, and put one company at each new station. That addressed our response time needs in the east part of town without adding new staff. That results in a savings of $1.6 million per year
  • Repurposed a single-family home to use as Fire Station No. 9, saving the cost of demolishing the existing structure and building a new station. The renovation cost $250,000. Building a new station would have cost more than $4 million
  • Contract right of way maintenance (mostly mowing of medians and the like) instead of having Transportation and Parks and Recreation staff do the work. That reduces the need for additional FTEs and equipment, and offers more flexibility for economic and weather changes

Repurposing of existing staff, positions

  • Repurpose of Database Administrator position in Information Technology to meet a greater need in General Services for a Superintendent for Building Construction
  • Due to the decline in Municipal Court workload, we transferred two positions to other divisions or departments, and shifted another position to Police records support
  • Finance and IT are refining processes and utilizing cloud-based services and other innovations to eliminate need for new staffing as other departments grow. We’ve added no new IT staff in five-plus years. A half of a  Finance FTE moved to Planning and Development Services. And the efficiencies gained by automatic meter reading implementation means we were able to freeze 1 current meter technician in fiscal 2017
  • In Transportation, we repurposed four FTEs for growth and project needs

Redefining support services

  • Consolidation of citywide inspections function in Planning to increase efficiencies
  • We deferred the purchase of a $1.3 million Fire apparatus into FY 17 to allow replacement of overdue Police vehicles without adding to budget
  • By switching to a new model for Police vehicles, we’re saving $5,600 per vehicle, with $240,000 saved to date
  • Shift to standard designs for new Fire stations — $94,000 savings realized to date
  • In-house expertise and planning for facility projects has reduced architect fees by approximately 2 percent — $710,000 saved to date

Re-evaluate funding sources — grants, outside funding and volunteers

  • The Library‘s effective use of volunteers offset staffing costs by $125,000 per year
  • Of the $110 million spent on roads in past five years, $36 million came from other agencies. More tasty details here

Restructuring administrative focus

  • Implemented a more robust investment management program to improve interest earnings without increasing risk. We estimate annual interest return improved by $125,000 per year
  • Consistently look for ways to reduce debt expenses. In FY 17, we refunded Type B sales tax backed bonds to realize $90,000 in annual interest savings. In FY 16 we completed four bond refinancings resulting in $927,000 in annual interest savings

In the next Budget Bite, we’ll dish on the key ingredient to our recipe for success — the Strategic Plan.