How you can be prepared for shark- and non-shark-related emergencies

It’s Shark Week here in our great nation and now is as good a time as ever to ensure we’re prepared for possible shark- and non-shark-related doom to strike at any time. Texans are no strangers to strange weather, and while shark-depositing tornadoes are most likely not an immediate threat, plenty of other disasters could happen in our area. Here are a few ways you can protect your family: 

Sign up Mommy Shark, Daddy Shark, Grandma Shark and Grandpa Shark for official emergency alerts.  

The City uses  Warn Central Texas  through the Capital Area Council of Governments’ Regional Notification System to send regional emergency alerts. Users choose what types of alerts they want to receive and how they want to receive the alerts, such as text message, phone call and/or email. Alerts are sent based off the location that was used to register for an account. To register, visit warncentraltexas.org.  

Brush up on the non-shark-related weather events that are most likely to happen in our community, and know what to do to stay informed. 

Flash flooding — not sharknados — is the number one weather-related killer in Texas. Nationally, more than half of all flash flood fatalities nationwide involve vehicles, so if you see water over the road, you should always remember to “turn around, don’t drown.” We doubt there are sharks in those flood waters, but it’s always best to play it safe. Be sure to stay up-to-date on the latest low water crossings during flooding events by visiting atxfloods.com. 

Make a basic emergency supply kit to survive in the wild (or at least a few days of being displaced). 

You’ve seen it on the news: floods that force homeowners to escape to their roofs, wildfires that leave residents without their belongings — would you be prepared if the same happened here? Having a basic emergency supply kit ready to go at all times can be a literal lifesaver. Here are a few things you can have ready: 

  • Basic first aid kit, seven-day supply of medications
  • Extra cash in small bills
  • Spare change of clothes
  • Spare home/car key
  • Family and emergency contact information
  • Pet supplies (collar, leash, tags, food, bowl)
  • Copies of personal documents in water-tight bag
  • 1 gallon of water per person, per day (3-day supply)
  • 3-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Sanitation/personal hygiene items
  • Chargers, flashlight, extra batteries  

Pay attention to the warning signs for storms, and take shelter when necessary. 

Much like the theme song of Jaws, thunder is a big indicator that something dangerous is about to take place. When thunder roars — go indoors! Seek shelter immediately in a sturdy building or, if a building is not available, a hard-topped vehicle with the windows rolled up. Lightning — and shark attacks — are often used as a metaphor for all things unlikely, but the truth is that an average 47 deaths and 500+ injuries are reported each year in the U.S. due to lightning strikes.   

Want to learn more helpful tips and information about emergency preparedness in Round Rock? Visit the Round Rock Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management’s website at roundrocktexas.gov/departments/fire/emergency-management